About Our GP PDF Print E-mail

Dr. Isam Saleh MD, PhD, DCMAc

Dr. Saleh is a highly experienced doctor, having worked in many different areas of medicine all over the world. He has now been a GP at the Wenlock Surgery since 1998.

He has gained his MD in 1983, and then went on to study his PhD. Dr. Saleh has worked in various hospitals around the world, in areas such as General Surgery, Urology and Orthopaedics. He has also worked for the US Army in a General Hospital where he was Deputy Chief of the Outpatient Clinic and of the Physical Examination department. He was also the representative to the Therapeutic Advisory Board – teaching and supervising physician assistants, nurse practitioners and soldier-medics.

Dr. Saleh has worked in several renowned UK hospitals including the Royal National Orthopaedics Hospital, St Thomas’ & St Bartholomew’s Hospital and Whipps Cross Hospital, all based in and around of London. He finally settled in Luton, where he started work at Wenlock Surgery.


Dr. Saleh’s passion for helping people hasn’t stopped there though – in 2005 he decided to embark on also becoming a Doctor of Chinese Traditional Medicine and Acupuncture. In 2008, he graduated with a DCMAc from the University of Beijing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GP Earnings

 

Contact Us

Address: 

Wenlock Surgery 

 

40 Wenlock Street 

 

Luton 

 

LU2 0NN 

 

 

 

Tel:

Fax: 

 01582 343 347

0844 5769786 

E-mail: 

wenlock.surgery@nhs.net

Newsflash

“Children with severe peanut allergies have been cured,” The Daily Telegraph has reported. This was one of several newspaper articles reporting on a study of a treatment to make four allergic boys less sensitive to peanuts.

NHS.UK News

NHS Choices News